History of Bondage

Shibari History

Rope Bondage has three main styles: Japanese, also known as Shibari, Western Rope Bondage, and decorative Rope bondage. They all differ in different ways.  I will give you a brief history of bondage to show where these influences originated. This does not mean that people didn’t tie up for sexual enjoyment before that time though.

Contemporary Rope Bondage starts in Japan and the United States in the early 1900s.
The rope has played important roles in Japanese history and sacred traditions. It all started with a technique called hojojutsu, that was used for capturing and restraining criminals with rope. Of course, these practices were not erotic or sensual, but contemporary Shibari or Rope Bondage was born with this influence.

Development of modern Shibari with sensual, erotic and sadomasochistic tendencies started In the 1920s with Seiu Ito. This artist who created paintings of erotic bondage inspired by representations in theatre and history, mostly based on hojojutsu.
In the 1940s, Hollywood presented “Damsel in Distress”. Meanwhile, John Willie begins creating erotic artwork and photography involving rope bonged that influenced many future artists.  

Then, in the 1950s, Irving Klaw began critic photos of bound women, in which the model was Bettie Page. In the same year, Kitan Club magazine began publishing SM bondage images, articles and tutorial, which include the work from Chimuo Nureki.
Later, in the 1960s Eric Stanton begins creating bondage comics, Hose of Milan starts publishing bondage magazines and videos, and Eikichi Osada starts doing Public rope bondage with Osada Seminar Shows.

In the 1970s Robert Bishop begins publishing his pen-and-ink illustrations in bondage magazines, and at the same time, John Blakemore begins publishing bondage sets and videos.

In the 1980s is where the Blanding of Eastern & Western Bondage begins. Harmony communications begin publishing bondage magazines and videos, and Denki Akechi starts performing and making videos.

In the 1990s Devonshire Productions begin publishing bondage material under the direction of Simone Devon and Bran Davis and Mai Randa and Ranki Kazami begin performing.

In the 2000s Jim Weathers starts Bondage Cafe and “Two Knotty Boys” start teaching Shibari, and Midori publishes The Seductive Art of Japanese Bondage.

Today, Shibari or Rope Bondage influence continues to grow and every day the number of practitioners increases.

Want to learn Shibari? Go to Shibari Academy  for the most comprehensive and easy-to-follow Shibari courses available online.