Shibari in Spain

Shibari in Spain

Shibari in Spain comes from the fascination for Japanese culture and fashion for sadomasochism. Now, this country practices the ancient art of sex with ropes. This discipline combines an ancient Japanese tradition with erotism linked to BDSM (Bondage, Domination, and Sado-Masochism).

Shibari in Spain: the Beginnings

We can trace its beginning to, at least, two points in time. The first is the open-mindedness that we have experienced in the last decades. The second, the contemporary fascinations for Japan on its gastronomy. In addition, this list must include an admiration for the language and its aesthetic practices. Moreover, the boom of Fifty Shades of Gray, both the book by E. L. James and the film adaptation (2015), also contributed to the ongoing gaining of space of shibari in Spain. Even Mónica Naranjo put it into practice in her first television show, Mónica y el sexo, where she let herself hang from the ceiling tied by ropes. She did so while she was in Japan getting into shibari.

How it Slowly Integrated

This insertion of shibari in Spain became even more evident thanks to a specific person. It all started with the words of the only person in Spain with a specific certificate. This cert came from a Japanese teacher, one allowed to teach level 1 of Yagami Ren Ryü, the own style of Yagami Ren, named shakibaku.

Some people (incorrectly) think that shibari only means hanging from the ceiling tied with ropes. However, we who are in the deep, know there is no need to start so high—it is actually surely the opposite which is better. The learning of shibari is gradual—even slow and difficult—and maybe, perhaps, the rope ends up being the least important item in the discipline.

Shibari in Spain: the Kinky Club

As a result, the Kinky Club was born out of the need. First, it was a need to find people in the area with whom to share and to grow the love for shibari. This love started as nawakai, which means “friends of ropes.” The gatherings began withmonthly reunions in a shared space with other underground practices. After a few years, it was time to open a space dedicated exclusively to shibari. A decade ago, a man who calls himself Mr. Interior, launched the Kinky Club in Gijon: a private space to hold workshops. Japanese and international teachers attend and attempt to deepen in the practice of shibari amongst the Spaniard communities.

The Kinky Club was first seen as a “whorehouse” or a social place to go to parties and performances. In opposition, the truth is that the people who constitute it focus on shibari training and personal experiences. This is a place where you can get a shared approach by practicing with your partner. It allows to export more things from the source disciple and to do so in greater depth.

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